Using Web Video Conferencing to Host an Effective Online Sales Presentation – 6 Best Practice Tips

Although the most effective way to build strong relationships with your customers is still face-to-face, that is not always practical. Luckily web video conferencing can be almost as effective. Even if your customer or prospective lead lives half way around the world, it is still necessary to host sales meetings and presentations – the impersonal nature of email will only get you so far.

A number of excellent, easy-to-use solutions exist to host your online meeting or webinar. Personally, I’ve used and participated in WebEx meetings many times and always had a positive experience, although their costs can add up quickly as meetings get larger or more frequent. There are more affordable and just as capable and reliable web video conferencing choices out there also for online meetings or webinars.

Here are my 6 top best practices for getting the most out of web video conferencing for successful sales presentations:

  1. The number one thing to remember is that you must treat the web video conferencing meeting as you would a “real” face-to-face meeting: dress professionally, plan the agenda carefully, do not multitask (close your email and other applications before the meeting starts so you have no distractions).
  2. Choose a service provider carefully – you need to be sure they can meet your goals for the meeting in a professional manner;
  3. Be considerate of participants’ time: in a web video conferencing session they are not a captive audience, and will get distracted by email and other business demands if you don’t maintain their interest;
  4. Put together a crisp agenda, with meeting goals and strategies to achieve them;
  5. Have a plan to encourage live interaction. You could have some questions to ask of your customer to spur discussion, or include someone who’s role it is to ask the first questions or add comments to get interaction going;
  6. Have a clear call-to-action at the end of the meeting. Too often web meetings are ended abruptly (after all, since you are not face-to-face, there will not be the usual opportunity for small talk or next steps discussion as the customer is ushering you to the door). Include time in the agenda for wrap up and next steps, with clear action items for the attendees.

Tips to Prepare for a Work Presentation

It is not always an easy task when you have to speak in front of others. Some speakers may leave the podium pouring with sweat. Actually, by having little preparation, you will be able to deliver an informative presentation easily. By checking out the following tips, you will get the help for preparing your presentation as well as implementing a good presentation.

Firstly, you should get the details. If your boss asks you to give a presentation, you do not have to be panic. Even if you are stunned at the first and cannot ask questions, you need to give yourself time for regrouping. After you are ready, you can start to get many details as possible. Try to find out the time and the location you are going to give presentation, who the audience is, and how many people will attend there.

Secondly, you have to consider about the audience. It is very important for you to know your audience in order to setting up and deliver an effective presentation. You should know whether you are going to speak in front of small or large group, young or old people, male or female audience, and so forth.

Thirdly, you need to explore your setting. If you are a person who likes setting matters, it is suggested for you to visit the room you are going to speak in. You can try to get a feel for the lighting and the layout of the room. If it is necessary, you can make some notes about certain things like projectors and boards that can be used as visual aids. By knowing your setting, it can put yourself at ease.

Lastly, you need to consider about the technology. Using PowerPoint can be very effective to help you in reiterating your talking points, taking some attentions from the audience, and also giving great visual points for your audience.

Shamus Brown’s Top 5 Sales Presentation Tips

When its time to give your next sales presentation, here are my favorite tips for delivering powerful, charismatic, and engaging sales presentations.

#1 – PLANT YOUR FEET SQUARELY ON THE FLOOR

How you hold your physical body during your sales pitch communicates a tremendous amount of information about you to your audience. Studies have shown a person will unconsciously interpret approximately 55% of the meaning of your message from physiological cues in your body position, stance, and facial expressions.

Deliver your presentation from a position of confidence. Stand with your feet squarely between your shoulders. Distribute your weight evenly between your legs, and plant your feet firmly on the ground. Keep your arms relaxed at your sides, until your are ready to make a gesture.

Shifting your weight from one leg to another communicates to the audience a lack of confidence. This comes across unconsciously in that if you were to ask someone, a typical response might be “he didn’t seem like believed in his company” or “I not sure that I can trust her”.

Try both the balanced and the unbalanced speaking postures right now, and see which one makes you feel more confident and ready for your next sales presentation.

#2 – GET PUMPED UP

It is your job to lead the audience. The reason they are there to get something from you. So you must lead them where you want them to go. If you want people to get excited about your product or to feel a sense of trust towards you and your company, you must first create this emotion within yourself.

How do you do this? Simple. Do whatever it takes to get yourself excited. Jump up and down. Clap your hands. Play your favorite music loud. High five your sales partner. You can do this where you won’t be seen by the prospect (in your car, in the customer’s stairwell, bathroom or outside the building). What do you think a rock star or an actor does to warm-up before going on stage?

The idea is to begin your presentation in an absolutely great state. Do this right and the audience will follow your where you want them to go.

Special tip: Use this technique before making important phone calls so that you are “on” when you make the call.

#3 – WARM-UP THE AUDIENCE

Another thing big rock stars do before coming out on stage is they have warm-up acts. The job of a warm-up act is to get the audience in a mood will be receptive of the main act’s energy.

You can accomplish this same effect by simply playing music before you start your presentation. Many laptops have CD players these days, or you can use a boom-box. The type of music you play will depend on your audience, and the emotional state that you want to warm your audience up to. Just think about how this will set you apart from your competition’s stale PowerPoint slide show.

#4 – BEGIN WITH AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION

The more rapport you have with an individual or a group, the more receptive they will be to your message. One way to build rapport with your audience is by asking questions of your audience during your first few minutes on stage.

Ask a question or two that most people can easily answer (but don’t put anyone on the spot too much). Questions such as “How far did you come to get here?” and “How long have you been working in this field?” easily get conversation going and begin creating a relationship between you and your audience.

#5 – SUSTAIN EYE CONTACT WITH INDIVIDUALS

You probably know you should do this. Now here’s why and how.

The more frequently you change the location of your focus, the more new information your brain is taking in. Your eyes are the visual sensory input system for your brain. Change focus fast enough and frequently enough, and you overload your brain to the point where you forget where you are at in the presentation. Aaaaggh!

Maintain your concentration on what you want to say next by fixing your visual focus for short periods of time. Do this by completing a thought or a sentence (whichever you find easier) while sustaining eye contact with one person. Move eye contact to a new person with each new thought or sentence.

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