Ways to Maximise the Potential of Your Business Presentation

Business presentations are a collateral reflection of who you are. A glimpse of your personality could be seen in the ways and the content of your presentation.

The way you carry yourself, the way you speak, deliver your sentences, tackle tricky questions with confidence and successfully convey your message, speak volumes about your personality.

Still, there are much more ways in which you can support your business presentation to reach its maximum potential.

HIGHLIGHT YOUR SUPERPOWER

A positive way to keep your audience attentive to you is to show them that you are worth their time and trust. Rather than speaking about your achievements and future goals, speak about your credibility because if even little points will exist with which the crowd will not feel connected to then the tables will instantly turn.

Talk about your goals within the first few minutes of the presentation

Choose your presentation design which corresponds with your goals, which should be introduced to your audience as early as possible. This will help your audience to correlate what you are expressing with the ‘why’ and ‘what’ you want to achieve.

Never underestimate the impact of a powerful image/quote

A business presentation is usually a collection of fertile ideas, knit together as one to illustrate a larger picture. So, the smart use of different images/quotes to introduce different ideas will supply more power to your presentation. Vocalising the quotes or speaking few important words out loud will bring your presentation to life, especially if the presentation has numerous bar graphs, bullet points, and pie charts.

GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE THE POWER TO BRAINSTORM OVER YOUR QUESTIONS

One of the unbeatable ways to make your presentation more interactive is to begin it with a question which you, yourself will answer. Like you can start with “I asked myself what all can my team will be able to do and contribution for making this project a success?”. So, based on this question you can build up your presentation. Be alert to all the questions from your audience as they are icebergs of curiosity. The more you will suffice your audience, the stronger their trust will grow in you.

Be ready to tackle tough questions

Always be confident and logical at answering the questions from the audience. There will always be questions whose responses if given without solid facts and coherence, will put your image down in your crowd’s eyes. If you know your topic as well as you’re your audience, then always keep your business binary clean and do not ever shelve any question from the audience.

KEEP YOUR OWN QUESTIONS READY IF NOBODY ASKS YOU ANY

It could be a possibility that your audience is shy or somewhat hesitant to ask you questions about your presentations. Always remember, if you face this kind of a situation, then always compose a question to yourself because ‘zero curiosity’ turns into ‘zero interest’ overnight.

Take your crowd on a final journey

Always take your crowd on a final journey before you wrap up the presentation. Highlight all the important points and tell the crowd how they will be productive if given proper attention by the appropriate crowd.

Keeping the immense support in mind which we get from the PowerPoint presentations, one should also be able to support her/himself equally well during the closing moments of the presentation because humans invented the PowerPoint and not vice versa.

How to Produce an Impressive PowerPoint Presentation

Here are the top 10 tips for creating an effective PowerPoint report that will impress your clients

  1. Only tell your clients what they need to hear. The most important thing to keep in mind when constructing a PowerPoint presentation is that you must only tell your clients what they need to know – not everything you learned while completing the report. Clients are busy and stressed like everyone else, and only want to hear the key messages that address the solution
  2. Clear structure. Every PowerPoint should contain the following slides:

    • The Cover Page
    • The Disclaimer Page
    • The Contents Page and Section Dividers
    • An Executive Summary
    • Content Slides
  3. Clear headlines for each slide. The headline should form a link between the message on the previous slide and the message on the next page. Headlines must add value and answer a client’s “so what” question. Your headline should also make sense, and should help the page to stand-alone. In other words, if someone found just that one slide, it should make sense to him or her without seeing any of the other slides. The headline should only be one sentence long.
  4. One message per page. All slides should be page-numbered except for the contents page and the section dividers. Each slide should communicate only one message. Use bullets to communicate either quotes or facts. You can use an appendix for more in-depth information that you wish to share with your client.
  5. Kickers. You may wish to add something to your slide called a “kicker.” Kickers are added to a PowerPoint presentation to add clarification, summarization, or implications of any information that has been presented.
  6. Clear language. When creating an effective PowerPoint, you will use bullet points and sub-bullets, not full sentences. Sequential text should contain parallel text, and your style should feature active voice rather than passive voice i.e. the noun and the verb should come at the beginning of the sentence. Make sure you are specific use only the words that need to be used, and refer to the company as “it” not “they.” Do not use contractions.
  7. Large font. Your font should never go under 10 points when constructing a PowerPoint for presentation.
  8. Clear sourcing of data.When using notes or sources, you will need to refer to notes with letters and sources should be identified with numbers. The notes and sources list will come underneath the data. Anytime two data sets are on one page, put all sources and notes at the bottom of the page.
  9. Evidence based opinions. If any opinions are included in the presentation, they need to be tightly linked to evidence supporting the statement. There is no place in your presentation for bold assumptions or conjectures.
  10. White space. Finally, make sure that you leave white space in your presentation. If you don’t have white space, you have put entirely too much into your presentation. If this is the case for you, delete the information until you have only the necessary components to communicate the main ideas to your client. You can put the rest in the document’s appendix.

Creating Presentations

When asked to give a presentation, consider using the four P’s of presentation steps to help you with your creation. The four P’s are: Plan, Prepare, Practice, and Perform. This article will address steps one and two, which are about planning and preparing the presentation.

1. During Plan, you will consider your audience and why you are giving the presentation along with what generally appeals to them and why they may want to know about your subject. You will determine with the person requesting the presentation how much time you will have and what type of visual aids may be relevant and usable at the location of final presentation. You can find some hints in the Briefing section of the book “R.A!R.A! A Meeting Wizards’ Approach” that aids in development of planning questions to ask during this step such as:

  • When do I need to be there? Date of presentation with start/end times and location.
  • Who will be there? Description of primary audience and names of decision makers.
  • What will appeal to this audience and why do they want to know about this subject? Reason(s) presentation is necessary or relevant to this audience.
  • What types of supporting documents and audio/visuals are preferred by audience? Items such as projection or handouts that is preferred by or available with this audience.
  • How much of presentation time should be allowed for questions and answers at the end? Most presentations are followed by Q&A from audience to speaker and knowing the desired timeframe allows better time allotment of prepared speaking points.

2. Prepare your presentation by thinking about both the beginning and ending, and then add the detail in the middle that supports your strong start and end. Now that you know what to say and are aware of your visual aid limitation, think about how you can make the presentation memorable by developing any visuals that may accompany the presentation making sure their flow matches the presentation. When developing visuals, remember you don’t want people fumbling with handouts or noting spelling errors when they could be listening. When preparing, consider what the Presentation Plan form in the book “R.A!R.A! A Meeting Wizards’ Approach” suggests as possible outline questions for a briefing presentation:

  • Why are we here? Reasons presentation is necessary or desirable at this time.
  • What have we done? History, work, or statistics related to purpose or presentation.
  • What do we plan to do? Possible future outcomes or actions as result of presentation or decision to be made based on presentation.
  • What have we learned? Summary of presentation or recommendations.
  • What have we to share? Stories, statistics, charts, or other data to prove points.
  • What do we need? Resources to facilitate presentation and discussion or to accomplish actions.

With the Plan and Prepare steps, you have learned to ask questions to help you develop speaking points and visuals aids. To understand the Practice and Perform steps, see article on “Delivering Presentations”.